Celebrating #WorldImmunizationWeek – The post-Wakefield fallout.

by Jeremy D. Bailoo, PhD In our previous piece, we showed how Andrew Wakefield fabricated data claiming that the MMR vaccine caused autism. The fallout from this fabrication--the “anti-vaxxer” movement--continues even today. https://giphy.com/gifs/link-article-ic-10xobTbHX49uvK Subsequent to Wakefield’s studies and claims, researcher’s started investigating the links between the MMR vaccination and autism, given the seriousness of the … Continue reading Celebrating #WorldImmunizationWeek – The post-Wakefield fallout.

Celebrating #WorldImmunizationWeek – The MMR-Andrew Wakefield Scandal

by Jeremy D. Bailoo, PhD In our previous post, we highlighted how vaccines work and all of the effort that goes into ensuring safety and efficacy. So how did we get a point in our history where people fail to see the value of getting vaccinated? As a thought exercise, imagine that you lived in … Continue reading Celebrating #WorldImmunizationWeek – The MMR-Andrew Wakefield Scandal

Celebrating #WorldImmunizationWeek – Vaccinations, how and why they work.

by Jeremy D. Bailoo, PhD In light of #WorldImmunizationWeek we are doing a series of posts which highlight facts pertaining to vaccine production, and how safety and efficacy is assessed (part 1). We also highlight the historical aspects that lead to the “anti-vaxxer” movement and why critical consideration of the facts pertaining to that movement … Continue reading Celebrating #WorldImmunizationWeek – Vaccinations, how and why they work.

Two Stories that Demonstrate Just How Rare Good Science Reporting Has Become

Over the past week, two national news stories have nicely illustrated the distressing (and at times, depressing) state of science reporting.  The most recent headlines appeared on Wednesday when researchers announced they had developed a method for preventing the brain from rapidly decomposing in the early hours after death. Here’s a link to the press … Continue reading Two Stories that Demonstrate Just How Rare Good Science Reporting Has Become

Cat Fight or Smear Campaign? You Be the Judge

Anyone who regularly follows the news, likely spotted some of the headlines that surfaced during a several months-long battle over a USDA research project involving cats.  Examples include: Cat cannibalism: Report Discloses ‘Questionable’ Gov’t Animal Experiments  USDA Kitten Killing Comes Under Fire From Bipartisan Group of Lawmakers   and  Watchdog Sues to Expose Secret Government … Continue reading Cat Fight or Smear Campaign? You Be the Judge

How many cigarettes in with a bottle of wine?

by Jeremy D. Bailoo, PhD Often in the news we read about current and future problems relating to human health and disease. Take, as an example, the recent news article in BBC titled “How many cigarettes in a bottle of wine?” At first blush , this article is catchy, highlighting a research study of humans in … Continue reading How many cigarettes in with a bottle of wine?

8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging

In February, the American Journal of Primatology (AJP) published a Special Issue entitled, “Marmosets as a Translational Model for Aging Studies.” The Special Issue contains a comprehensive set of studies that provides crucial new information to help guide the further development of this animal model of aging. It also emphasizes the value  and necessity of … Continue reading 8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging