#Evergreen: Sex, Drugs and the Validity of the Animal Model

April 16th 2021 We have continued to highlight the valuable role that #AnimalResearch plays in bringing improvements to quality of life and life saving cures from bench to bedside (e.g., here, here, here). We also have continued to emphasize the process of science as a self-correcting endeavor, and that this is a feature not a … Continue reading #Evergreen: Sex, Drugs and the Validity of the Animal Model

#Evergreen: Predictability and Utility of Animal Models

March 26th 2021 Yesterday we highlighted one of the myths that those opposed to #AnimalResearch often spend their time propagating—that #AnimalResearch is only performed in benefit to humans—usually alongside the myth that #AnimalResearch fails to translate to humans. It is thus timely to highlight another of our posts debunking another prevalent and sensational claim—that 99% of drugs … Continue reading #Evergreen: Predictability and Utility of Animal Models

International collaborations can both maintain animal welfare standards and advance science

March 10th 2021 Anna Mitchell, PhD, Michele A. Basso PhD and Renée Hartig PhD Please note that this article is published within a series of Speaking of Research posts to come that incorporate the range of viewpoints and perspectives on international regulations and collaborations between animal researchers. In the midst of an ongoing pandemic, there … Continue reading International collaborations can both maintain animal welfare standards and advance science

Progress in Parkinson’s disease depends on Primate and other #AnimalResearch

February 24th 2021 Marina Emborg, MD PhD, Jeremy Bailoo, PhD and Doris Doudet, PhD Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. The population prevalence of PD increases from about 1% at age 60 to 4% by age 80. From 1999 to 2017, the age-adjusted death rate for Parkinson disease … Continue reading Progress in Parkinson’s disease depends on Primate and other #AnimalResearch

Absolutist Views Crumble As COVID-19 Vaccine Becomes Available

February 16th 2021 Michele A. Basso, Ph.D. Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles I am stunned. Cory Mac (full name Cory Mac a’Ghobhainn), the leader of a group called Progress for Science (P4S) either is a hypocrite, or she is ignorant of how science works, in spite of the name … Continue reading Absolutist Views Crumble As COVID-19 Vaccine Becomes Available

Guest post: How Overeating Changes the Brain

This is a guest post by Professor Juan M. Dominguez and is reposted with permission from his blog at Psychology Today. Dominguez is a behavioral neuroscient and professor of psychology at the University of Texas-Austin. His research focuses on the neural-endocrine regulation of motivated behaviors and associated disorders like addiction; using mating behavior as a … Continue reading Guest post: How Overeating Changes the Brain

Animal Testing: Humane Research from a Human Perspective

It is not often that we publish student essays on Speaking of Research, however, when we received the following essay from Zaim Zibran, a junior at Walton High School in Georgia, US, we felt compelled to share it. Zaim is currently doing a summer internship at the James P Grant School of Public Health in … Continue reading Animal Testing: Humane Research from a Human Perspective

The Importance of Animal Experimentation and the mdx mouse model to Muscular Dystrophy Research

Louise Richardson is a PhD student at the University of Leeds. Her work focuses on satellite cells and their contribution to skeletal muscle plasticity, with a view to understanding more about genetic muscle disorders and sarcopenia. She has a Masters of Research with an in-vivo specialisation and a BSc. in Human Anatomy. In this post … Continue reading The Importance of Animal Experimentation and the mdx mouse model to Muscular Dystrophy Research