Nobel Prize 2014: Fortune favours the prepared mind

Speaking of Research congratulates John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser on being awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain”. By recording the activity of individual nerve cells within the brains of rats that were moving freely through their … Continue reading Nobel Prize 2014: Fortune favours the prepared mind

Interfacing with the nervous system: Studies in mice and rats show the way.

As fundamental scientific knowledge about how the nervous system works has increased over the past few decades, the possibility has emerged that we may one day be able to use electrical stimulation (or inhibition) to treat – even to functionally cure – conditions where it has been damaged by disease or injury.  Scientists are now … Continue reading Interfacing with the nervous system: Studies in mice and rats show the way.

Good, bad, useful? Reflections on animal models for Parkinson’s disease research

Parkinson’s disease is a relentless, ruthless neurodegenerative disorder that often strikes in the early “golden years”, around 60 years of age, but sometimes much earlier.  It progressively robs its victims of every capability that makes life enjoyable, from their ability to move, talk, eat by mouth, and in the worst cases, decreasing their cognitive abilities. … Continue reading Good, bad, useful? Reflections on animal models for Parkinson’s disease research

STOP lying about research at the University of British Columbia

In a post a couple of weeks ago entitled “End of primate research at the University of Toronto?” Allyson Bennet wrote about the truth behind the spin that primate research has ceased at the University of Toronto (UT), commenting that:  If nothing else, those inclined to dodge should consider that they are deriving benefit from … Continue reading STOP lying about research at the University of British Columbia