Daily Archives: August 10, 2017

American Psychological Association reaffirms support for animal research

The American Psychological Association (APA) represents its membership of 115,700 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students working across the many subfields of psychology. The APA works to advance the creation, communication, and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives. On August 2nd, 2017, the organization reaffirmed its support for the careful use of animals in medical research. Speaking of Research welcome this clear statement of principles. We reproduce that statement below. 


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APA Reaffirms Support for Research with Nonhuman Animals

The American Psychological Association has reaffirmed its long-standing support for ethically sound and scientifically valid research with nonhuman animals and the scientists who conduct it, noting that the application of such research has “significantly improved the health and well-being of both human and nonhuman animals.”

“Historically, laboratory animal research has played a crucial role in the development of theory and research in virtually all sub-disciplines of psychology,” said APA President Antonio E. Puente, PhD, who is a neuropsychologist. “Knowledge gained through research with laboratory animals continues to provide answers to questions important to advancing the science of behavior and to improving the welfare of both humans and other animals.”

Understanding of such processes as learning, attention and cognition and disorders such as addictions, autism and depression has benefited from findings of nonhuman animal studies. Knowledge gained through research with nonhuman animals has also been critical to conservation efforts for various species, in various habitats across the world.

APA’s governing Council of Representatives passed a resolution on the subject Wednesday, reaffirming a resolution that was last adopted in 1990, and is reflected throughout the 125-year history of the organization. The resolution notes nonhuman animal research is foundational to scientific discoveries as is evidenced by the fact that most scientists support such research, and that such research is regulated by federal, state and local jurisdictions, as well as assessed for scientific merit by funding agencies and peer review. Additionally, the resolution asserts the responsibility of scientists themselves to ensure the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals.

The resolution recognizes that the public might not fully appreciate “the nature of nonhuman animal research and its benefits to society, due to overabundance of misinformation and simultaneous dearth of accurate information” in the public domain.

“Nonhuman animal research has proven invaluable for exploring the complexity of diverse behaviors across genetic, molecular, cellular/neuronal, circuit, network, cognitive and behavior levels,” the resolution states. “The assembly and application of findings from nonhuman animal research has contributed to numerous clinical applications that have significantly improved the health and well-being of both human and nonhuman animals.”

Studies that used animals have played a role in the prevention or treatment of conditions as diverse as tuberculosis, diabetes, polio, Parkinson’s disease, muscular dystrophy and high blood pressure — to name just a few benefits of this research. Although such research continues to provide important scientific data and insights, understanding and support of such research has declined in recent years among the American public. Moreover, some activist groups have spread misinformation about this research, have harassed psychologists and other scientists and have destroyed laboratories. APA’s reaffirmation of its position on nonhuman animal research is one step toward strengthening the public’s knowledge and support of this research and the scientists who conduct it, according to Puente.

“APA deplores the harassment of scientists, students and laboratory assistants who have been involved in animal research,” Puente said. “We join with other scholarly organizations in continuing to support ethically sound and scientifically valid research with nonhuman animals.”

APA’s Committee on Animal Research and Ethics, which was founded in 1925, developed and regularly updates its “Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in the Care and Use of Nonhuman Animals in Research.” These guidelines assist researchers in fulfilling their obligation for the humane care and treatment of nonhuman animals in research that is in the public’s interest.