Weekly Roundup: Ebola vaccine hope for apes, gene therapy for dogs, and research into stroke

Welcome to the second of our weekly roundups. These Friday posts aim to inform our readers about the many stories that relate to animal research each week. Do you have an animal research story we should include in next week’s roundup? You can send it to us via our Facebook page or through the contact form on the website.

  • The first orally administered vaccine for Ebola developed for the conservation of wild apes, has completed its first and final biomedical research trial for the foreseeable future. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that the vaccine was effective and did not induce health complications or lead to signs of stress in the apes. Lead investigator, Peter Walsh statedIn an ideal world, there would be no need for captive chimpanzees. But this is not an ideal world. It is a world where diseases such as Ebola, along with rampant commercial poaching and habitat loss, are major contributors to rapidly declining wild ape populations.Oral vaccines offer a real opportunity to slow this decline. The major ethical debt we owe is not to a few captive animals, but to the survival of an entire species we are destroying in the wild: our closest relatives.

One of the captive chimpanzees in the research trial receiving the oral Ebola vaccination. Credit: Matthias Schnell, Thomas Jefferson University.

  • A new compound, P7C3-A20, has been shown to prevent brain cell death and to promote new cell growth in a rat model of ischemic stroke. Nearly 87% of all strokes are ischemic strokes. Strokes kill 130,000 Americans yearly, with someone in the USA having a stroke every 40 seconds and with a death occurring every 4 minutes.
  • A new gene therapy, which aims to treat the fatal muscle-wasting disease, myotubular myopathy or MTM, has shown considerable success in dogs. Like humans, dogs naturally get this disease as a result of a genetic defect which tends to lead to breathing difficulty and early death. One year after a single gene therapy treatment, the dogs with the condition were indistinguishable from the control group. This offers huge promise for future human therapies for MTM. Results were published in Molecular Therapy.

Image from Science Daily

  • A team of scientists have prevented and alleviated two autoimmune diseases, multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes, in early stage mouse models. Autoimmune diseases affect an estimated 23 million Americans, and this research using mice highlights the importance of animal research in alleviating these debilitating diseases.
  • A new study finds that Lactobacillus, a common bacteria found in yogurt, may be used to alleviate symptoms associated with depression in mice – providing hope for the 7% of the population that experience a major depressive episode at least once in their lifetime. The study was published in Scientific Reports.

Image by Understanding Animal Research.

  • Canadian animal rights group, Last Chance for Animals, has alleged mistreatment of animals at the Contract Research Organisation, ITR Laboratories. The footage was included in a CTV W5 news report. In response to the infiltration video, ITR Labs released a statement saying they had parted ways with a number of technicians seen inappropriately handling animals in the footage. The Canadian Council of Animal Care also released a statement explaining that an inspection of the ITR facilities was now being organized.

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