Two Stories that Demonstrate Just How Rare Good Science Reporting Has Become

Over the past week, two national news stories have nicely illustrated the distressing (and at times, depressing) state of science reporting.  The most recent headlines appeared on Wednesday when researchers announced they had developed a method for preventing the brain from rapidly decomposing in the early hours after death. Here’s a link to the press … Continue reading Two Stories that Demonstrate Just How Rare Good Science Reporting Has Become

How many cigarettes in with a bottle of wine?

by Jeremy D. Bailoo, PhD Often in the news we read about current and future problems relating to human health and disease. Take, as an example, the recent news article in BBC titled “How many cigarettes in a bottle of wine?” At first blush , this article is catchy, highlighting a research study of humans in … Continue reading How many cigarettes in with a bottle of wine?

8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging

In February, the American Journal of Primatology (AJP) published a Special Issue entitled, “Marmosets as a Translational Model for Aging Studies.” The Special Issue contains a comprehensive set of studies that provides crucial new information to help guide the further development of this animal model of aging. It also emphasizes the value  and necessity of … Continue reading 8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging

The animal research behind the new nasal spray depression treatment

Or, our tax dollars at work! Last week, the FDA approved a new drug for treatment-resistant depression (TRD). The nasal spray version of the drug ketamine, called Spravato (esketamine), is a newly-approved, fast-acting drug, available only with a doctor’s prescription, that could help millions. Did you know that a wide range of nonhuman animal research … Continue reading The animal research behind the new nasal spray depression treatment

New advances in optogenetics a key step towards treatment of neurological disorders

A technique neuroscientists use to view neurons in the brain and to turn them on and off with light, called optogenetics, is a promising strategy that could eventually treat a wide range of disorders, from chronic pain to conditions such as epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease. However, scientists using this technique have faced a major hurdle: … Continue reading New advances in optogenetics a key step towards treatment of neurological disorders

Understanding US Annual Reports on Number of Animals in Research

Allyson J. Bennett & Alanna Brownell Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison Nonhuman animals play an essential role in our understanding of systems that are key to health and disease in humans and other animals. Basic discoveries about physiological, neural, genetic, immunological, and other systems serve as the foundation for advances in medicine, including treatment and … Continue reading Understanding US Annual Reports on Number of Animals in Research

How transgenic mice are radically transforming science and medicine

by Juan Carlos Marvizon, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, UCLA Many of my scientists colleagues are thrilled about these new techniques. They represent the convergence of decades of work in areas as diverse as molecular biology, protein chemistry, cellular biology, neuroscience, microbiology, virology and animal behavior. They are likely to be applied to humans in the near … Continue reading How transgenic mice are radically transforming science and medicine