2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology & Medicine highlights the invaluable role of animal research

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded jointly to William Kaelin of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Peter Ratcliffe of the University of Oxford and the Francis Crick Institute, and Gregg Semenza of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine “for their discoveries of how cells sense and … Continue reading 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology & Medicine highlights the invaluable role of animal research

Animal research brings home the gold

The 2019 Golden Goose Awards have been announced, and once again animal research wins! These awards were established in 2012 by Rep. Jim Cooper (D-TN) to honor federally funded research“whose work may once have been viewed as unusual, odd, or obscure, but has produced important discoveries benefiting society in significant ways.” The awards, which have … Continue reading Animal research brings home the gold

8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging

In February, the American Journal of Primatology (AJP) published a Special Issue entitled, “Marmosets as a Translational Model for Aging Studies.” The Special Issue contains a comprehensive set of studies that provides crucial new information to help guide the further development of this animal model of aging. It also emphasizes the value  and necessity of … Continue reading 8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging

Open letter: Private workshop on the “necessity” of monkey research does not represent broad public interests or the scientific community

This weekend there will be science marches around the globe. Scientists and science proponents will gather to provide a visible sign of support for work that benefits the public, the environment, and the world in innumerable ways. The march has been highly publicized  - rightfully so, because it serves as a reminder that scientific research … Continue reading Open letter: Private workshop on the “necessity” of monkey research does not represent broad public interests or the scientific community

Herding Hemmingway’s Cats: Book review

What can cats with six toes, flies with wimpy testis, fish with hips, and mice with socks tell us about how our genes work? Turns out, they – together with a cast of characters ranging from bacteria to our own species – can tell us quite a lot. In Herding Hemmingway’s Cats: Understanding how our … Continue reading Herding Hemmingway’s Cats: Book review

Guest Post: How do birds see the world?

Today’s guest post is from Professor Aaron Blaisdell and graduate student Julia Schroeder in the Department of Psychology at the University of California Los Angeles. Prof. Blaisdell’s area of research is animal learning and comparative cognition. He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience at Binghamton University in 1999. Julia Schroeder is a … Continue reading Guest Post: How do birds see the world?

Undermining a cornerstone of medical research – examining a biased commentary on animal studies

Medical sociologist, Pandora Pound, and epidemiologist, Michael Bracken, recently wrote an opinion piece entitled "Is animal research sufficiently evidence based to be a cornerstone of biomedical research?" for the British Medical Journal. The article was chosen as the editor’s choice, leading to an editorial by the editor in chief, Fiona Godlee. Pound and Bracken criticise … Continue reading Undermining a cornerstone of medical research – examining a biased commentary on animal studies