Safety of COVID-19 antibody treatment tested #InMice #InMonkeys

June 22nd, 2021 While much has been written about the various COVID-19 vaccines (prevention), including here are Speaking of Research, less emphasis has been placed on the treatment of COVID-19 patients—both earlier on in the pandemic and even at present. Part of this relates to some inherent skepticism of the value of using existing treatments … Continue reading Safety of COVID-19 antibody treatment tested #InMice #InMonkeys

Why nonhuman primates are essential for addressing Alzheimer’s disease and women’s health issues

May 20th 2021Agnès Lacreuse, PhD Our world is aging at an unprecedented rate. The number of older people is projected to double every 20 years, and reach about 17% of the total population by 2050. These figures are alarming, as age is the primary risk factor for developing devastating diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). … Continue reading Why nonhuman primates are essential for addressing Alzheimer’s disease and women’s health issues

8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging

In February, the American Journal of Primatology (AJP) published a Special Issue entitled, “Marmosets as a Translational Model for Aging Studies.” The Special Issue contains a comprehensive set of studies that provides crucial new information to help guide the further development of this animal model of aging. It also emphasizes the value  and necessity of … Continue reading 8 Reasons Marmosets are Good Translational Models for Aging

Does talcum powder cause ovarian cancer? Weighing up the human and animal studies

In this article, Justin Varholick, investigates the evidence on whether talcum powder can cause ovarian cancer. Over the years, several courts have ruled that talcum powder can cause ovarian cancer, while the scientific evidence suggests otherwise. In light of Ovarian Cancer Month, it is important to highlight how animal and human studies can improve our … Continue reading Does talcum powder cause ovarian cancer? Weighing up the human and animal studies

Research Roundup: Artificial bile ducts, saving bat populations, safety of CRISPR and more

Welcome to this week’s Research Roundup. These Friday posts aim to inform our readers about the many stories that relate to animal research each week. Do you have an animal research story we should include in next week’s Research Roundup? You can send it to us via our Facebook page or through the contact form … Continue reading Research Roundup: Artificial bile ducts, saving bat populations, safety of CRISPR and more

Research Roundup: 3D printed ovaries, social ties and longevity, a new bone regeneration therapy, and more!

Welcome to this week’s Research Roundup. These Friday posts aim to inform our readers about the many stories that relate to animal research each week. Do you have an animal research story we should include in next week’s Research Roundup? You can send it to us via our Facebook page or through the contact form … Continue reading Research Roundup: 3D printed ovaries, social ties and longevity, a new bone regeneration therapy, and more!

Last surviving member of Pittsburgh polio vaccine team dies at 96

Dr. Julius S. Youngner, the last surviving member of the team that developed the Salk polio vaccine in the 1950s, died in his home on April 27 at the age of 96. Dr. Youngner, like many scientists, pursued a passion to help people via his love of the scientific method.  His own experiences as a child … Continue reading Last surviving member of Pittsburgh polio vaccine team dies at 96

Device to help stroke patients to recover moves from primates to people

Every year, 15 million people worldwide suffer a stroke, resulting in almost six million deaths and five million people left permanently disabled. It occurs when blood supply to the brain is blocked, or a blood vessel bursts. This prevents oxygen reaching the brain and can cause brain cells to die. Many people who suffer strokes … Continue reading Device to help stroke patients to recover moves from primates to people