Another Nobel, Another Win for Animal Research

It’s Nobel season! The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was announced today, and once again, animal research wins! Drs. James P. Allison (MD Anderson Cancer Center) and Tasaku Honjo (Kyoto University) will share the $1 million prize for their work in cancer immunotherapy, which relied on the critical contribution of animal models to … Continue reading Another Nobel, Another Win for Animal Research

Animal Research Plays Prominent Role in 2018 Lasker Awards

The Lasker Awards are among the most prestigious prizes in medicine in the U.S. Awarded annually, these awards — given by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation — honor exceptional contributions to biomedical research with a $250,000 prize in each of three categories. The honors are so highly regarded, they have been nicknamed “America’s Nobels.” … Continue reading Animal Research Plays Prominent Role in 2018 Lasker Awards

Research Roundup: Sewage and birds, combating Crohn’s disease, mice in Alzheimer’s research and more!

Welcome to this week’s Research Roundup. These Friday posts aim to inform our readers about the many stories that relate to animal research each week. Do you have an animal research story we should include in next week’s Research Roundup? You can send it to us via our Facebook page or through the contact form … Continue reading Research Roundup: Sewage and birds, combating Crohn’s disease, mice in Alzheimer’s research and more!

The Importance of Animal Experimentation and the mdx mouse model to Muscular Dystrophy Research

Louise Richardson is a PhD student at the University of Leeds. Her work focuses on satellite cells and their contribution to skeletal muscle plasticity, with a view to understanding more about genetic muscle disorders and sarcopenia. She has a Masters of Research with an in-vivo specialisation and a BSc. in Human Anatomy. In this post … Continue reading The Importance of Animal Experimentation and the mdx mouse model to Muscular Dystrophy Research

Mars, Machine Learning, and Mice: How a planetary science spin-off has the potential to improve imaging in animal research

Dr. Paul Tar is a research associate at the University of Manchester. In this guest post Paul explains the interdisciplinary journey taken between his PhD, in the analysis of planetary images, and current research post, in cancer studies. In this post he discusses how machine learning used to make measurements in space can also be … Continue reading Mars, Machine Learning, and Mice: How a planetary science spin-off has the potential to improve imaging in animal research

Seeing the Light: Managing Neuropathic Pain with Phototoxicity

Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that affects an estimated 6.9-10.0% of people and usually arises from damage to the nervous system. The mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain are complex and different than those causing acute pain and inflammatory pain, thus requiring a different therapeutic approach. Unfortunately, the majority of people with neuropathic pain do not … Continue reading Seeing the Light: Managing Neuropathic Pain with Phototoxicity

Does size matter? Evaluating the space requirements for laboratory mice.

Mice are the most commonly used laboratory animal – comprising approximately 70% of all animals used for research. Despite their widespread use, surprisingly little is known about how the behavioural biology of mice relates to the social and physical conditions of the laboratory environment. A team of researchers, from the Division of Animal Welfare at … Continue reading Does size matter? Evaluating the space requirements for laboratory mice.