Human mRNA vaccine trials in the 2010s? A history lesson in animal research

The recent mRNA vaccines for COVID-19 are the first of their kind, but they weren’t created overnight. RNA itself was discovered in the 1960s. Then, basic research in the 1970s paved the way for vaccine development in the 90s, optimization in the 2000s, clinical trials for influenza and rabies in the late 2010s

Safety of COVID-19 antibody treatment tested #InMice #InMonkeys

June 22nd, 2021 While much has been written about the various COVID-19 vaccines (prevention), including here are Speaking of Research, less emphasis has been placed on the treatment of COVID-19 patients—both earlier on in the pandemic and even at present. Part of this relates to some inherent skepticism of the value of using existing treatments … Continue reading Safety of COVID-19 antibody treatment tested #InMice #InMonkeys

FDA approves lung cancer drug #MPAR

June 3rd 2021 Recently, the FDA approved an Amgen drug, sotorasib, for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLS) with a specific mutation in a gene known as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) in patients whose disease has worsened after treatment with chemotherapy or other medicines. This mutation accounts for 13% of NSCLS—the most common … Continue reading FDA approves lung cancer drug #MPAR

#FactCheckNeeded: How are mice and rats accounted for in the balance of science, medicine, and animal welfare?

Faulty assumptions lead to faulty conclusions. Jeremy D. Bailoo, Sangy Panicker & Allyson J. Bennett January 12th 2021 A new entry in the seemingly eternal quest for universal adoption of European approaches to the regulation of research animals appeared today in the journal Scientific Reports. The author, US veterinarian Larry Carbone, estimates from a sample … Continue reading #FactCheckNeeded: How are mice and rats accounted for in the balance of science, medicine, and animal welfare?

Animal models paved the way for Phase III testing of the COVID-19 vaccine

Yesterday, NIH and Moderna announced the start of a multi-site, Phase 3 clinical trial of a candidate vaccine for COVID-19. This candidate vaccine uses messenger RNA, or mRNA, a “codebook” that cellular machinery “reads” in order to build proteins. For this candidate vaccine, the mRNA contains instructions for building spike proteins found on the coronavirus, … Continue reading Animal models paved the way for Phase III testing of the COVID-19 vaccine

Mice, rats, pigs – and my mom

December 6, 2019 by Amanda M. Dettmer, PhD, Associate Research Scientist, Yale Child Study Center My mother just came home from a 5-day stay in the hospital last night, and today, this article about new research from my fellow scientists at Yale landed in my inbox: Seeing as how my mom went in for issues … Continue reading Mice, rats, pigs – and my mom

Guest post: How Overeating Changes the Brain

This is a guest post by Professor Juan M. Dominguez and is reposted with permission from his blog at Psychology Today. Dominguez is a behavioral neuroscient and professor of psychology at the University of Texas-Austin. His research focuses on the neural-endocrine regulation of motivated behaviors and associated disorders like addiction; using mating behavior as a … Continue reading Guest post: How Overeating Changes the Brain

Another Nobel, Another Win for Animal Research

It’s Nobel season! The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was announced today, and once again, animal research wins! Drs. James P. Allison (MD Anderson Cancer Center) and Tasaku Honjo (Kyoto University) will share the $1 million prize for their work in cancer immunotherapy, which relied on the critical contribution of animal models to … Continue reading Another Nobel, Another Win for Animal Research