Animal studies contribute to development of a potential new treatment for Parkinson’s Disease

June 21, 2022 Doris Doudet & Allyson J. Bennett Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prominent neurodegenerative disease that affects more than 10 million people worldwide. It is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s disease. PD is associated with well-known motor symptoms such as tremor, slowness of movement and increased risks of falls but … Continue reading Animal studies contribute to development of a potential new treatment for Parkinson’s Disease

Is a molecule in brain fluid the fountain of youth?

June 3rd 2022 The search for a fountain of youth has haunted humans since the beginning of time. Now, researchers from Stanford University reported in the peer-reviewed journal, Nature1, that older mice receiving cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) from younger mice had their memory impairment reversed. Through a series of rigorous experiments spanning behavioral, cellular, and … Continue reading Is a molecule in brain fluid the fountain of youth?

#Brain Awareness Week: The Role of Animals in Neuroscience

March 17, 2022 If you’re a regular reader of the Speaking of Research science blog you will know that we are very interested in neuroscience – in fact several of us are neuroscientists – so you won’t be surprised to learn that we have been following events of Brain Awareness Week.  Brain Awareness Week is … Continue reading #Brain Awareness Week: The Role of Animals in Neuroscience

Novel Nanoparticle SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine elicits more Potent Protection #InMice #InGuineaPigs #InHamsters

The first generation of COVID-19 vaccines have been highly effective, but also have limitations: their efficacy can wane without a booster shot, and they may be less effective against some variants. Now, scientists have developed a more targeted vaccine that, in animal studies, shows stronger, broader, and more durable protection in a single, low dose. … Continue reading Novel Nanoparticle SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine elicits more Potent Protection #InMice #InGuineaPigs #InHamsters

Human mRNA vaccine trials in the 2010s? A history lesson in animal research

The recent mRNA vaccines for COVID-19 are the first of their kind, but they weren’t created overnight. RNA itself was discovered in the 1960s. Then, basic research in the 1970s paved the way for vaccine development in the 90s, optimization in the 2000s, clinical trials for influenza and rabies in the late 2010s

Safety of COVID-19 antibody treatment tested #InMice #InMonkeys

June 22nd, 2021 While much has been written about the various COVID-19 vaccines (prevention), including here are Speaking of Research, less emphasis has been placed on the treatment of COVID-19 patients—both earlier on in the pandemic and even at present. Part of this relates to some inherent skepticism of the value of using existing treatments … Continue reading Safety of COVID-19 antibody treatment tested #InMice #InMonkeys

FDA approves lung cancer drug #MPAR

June 3rd 2021 Recently, the FDA approved an Amgen drug, sotorasib, for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLS) with a specific mutation in a gene known as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) in patients whose disease has worsened after treatment with chemotherapy or other medicines. This mutation accounts for 13% of NSCLS—the most common … Continue reading FDA approves lung cancer drug #MPAR

#FactCheckNeeded: How are mice and rats accounted for in the balance of science, medicine, and animal welfare?

Faulty assumptions lead to faulty conclusions. Jeremy D. Bailoo, Sangy Panicker & Allyson J. Bennett January 12th 2021 A new entry in the seemingly eternal quest for universal adoption of European approaches to the regulation of research animals appeared today in the journal Scientific Reports. The author, US veterinarian Larry Carbone, estimates from a sample … Continue reading #FactCheckNeeded: How are mice and rats accounted for in the balance of science, medicine, and animal welfare?