Animal Testing: Humane Research from a Human Perspective

It is not often that we publish student essays on Speaking of Research, however, when we received the following essay from Zaim Zibran, a junior at Walton High School in Georgia, US, we felt compelled to share it. Zaim is currently doing a summer internship at the James P Grant School of Public Health in … Continue reading Animal Testing: Humane Research from a Human Perspective

2018: The Year the Readers Started Writing?

We had another record year at Speaking of Research, with web traffic up 30% compared with the previous year. Our viewers range from scientists, to students, to curious members of the public. Many of our readers are actively involved in biomedical research, as researchers, animal technicians, veterinarians, science writers and more. This post is aimed … Continue reading 2018: The Year the Readers Started Writing?

Guest Post: What it means for me to be a veterinary technician in biomedical research

James Champion is a registered veterinary technician that is the Director of Operations of Morehouse School of Medicine’s Center for Laboratory Animal Resources.  He has worked in animal research for over twelve years.  He was also awarded the AAALAC International Fellowship Award in 2015. Since I was a young child, I have gravitated towards all … Continue reading Guest Post: What it means for me to be a veterinary technician in biomedical research

Why are zebrafish such good models for scientists?

Today's guest post comes from Alex Buxton from the University of Cambridge, based on her interview with Professor Lalita Ramakrishnan about her research on zebrafish. Prof Ramakrishnan's research into immunology and infectious diseases at the University of Cambridge is funded by the Wellcome Trust and the National Institutes of Health. This article was originally posted … Continue reading Why are zebrafish such good models for scientists?

Guest Post: How do birds see the world?

Today’s guest post is from Professor Aaron Blaisdell and graduate student Julia Schroeder in the Department of Psychology at the University of California Los Angeles. Prof. Blaisdell’s area of research is animal learning and comparative cognition. He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience at Binghamton University in 1999. Julia Schroeder is a … Continue reading Guest Post: How do birds see the world?

En Passage, an Approach to the Use and Provenance of Immortalized Cell Lines

This guest post is by Lisa Krugner-Higby, DVM, PhD.  Dr. Krugner-Higby is a scientist and also a research veterinarian within the Research Animal Resource Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Krugner-Higby’s research is in development of extended-release formulations of analgesic and antimicrobial drugs. She previously worked in anti-HIV drug development. I am always fascinated … Continue reading En Passage, an Approach to the Use and Provenance of Immortalized Cell Lines